For COPD Awareness Month, Be Alert to Dangers of Indoor Air Pollutants, Company Advises

For COPD Awareness Month, Be Alert to Dangers of Indoor Air Pollutants, Company Advises

November is National Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Awareness Month, and to recognize it and the people with this disease, the testing laboratory EMSL Analytical reminded patients of indoor air quality pollutants, irritants, and allergens that can aggravate their condition.

According to EMSL, indoor air pollutants and allergens that may exacerbate COPD include dust and dust mites; pet dander; pollen; mold and bacteria; fumes from cleaning and other chemicals; dry cleaning chemicals; smoke from fireplaces and wood stoves; dirty heating, ventilation, and air conditioning ducts; dirty carpeting; some perfumes, scented soaps and shampoos; and infiltrated outdoor pollution.

“For those with COPD, identifying the presence of any of these in a work or home environment could help them manage their condition,” Joe Frasca, EMSL Analytical senior vice president of marketing, said in a press release.

“Results from indoor environmental quality testing can provide the necessary information about pollutant exposure risks that could then be mitigated or eliminated from a home or workplace to improve the respiratory health of people who have COPD,” he added.

According to Frasca, EMSL offers “environmental testing services, sampling supplies, test kits and air monitoring instrumentation to help in these efforts.”

The company also sponsored the production of an educational video about indoor allergens and pollutants, and their association with COPD.

COPD is considered the third-leading cause of death by disease in the United States. According to a 2017 report from the American Lung Association, roughly 15.3 million U.S. residents have been diagnosed with COPD, and millions more are likely to have the condition but are unaware of it.

The inflammatory disorder causes cough with mucus, wheezing, and shortness of breath (breath tightness).

While genetics are a factor in rare cases, the risks of COPD  can often be reduced by avoiding respiratory infections, indoor air pollutants, and tobacco smoke. Between 85 and 90 percent of all COPD cases are caused by cigarette smoking.

Although the disease can be treated and managed, it currently has no cure.

National COPD Awareness Month, observed every November, was created with the goal to increase awareness and educate the public about the disease.

Mary M. Chapman began her professional career at United Press International, running both print and broadcast desks. She then became a Michigan correspondent for what is now Bloomberg BNA, where she mainly covered the automotive industry plus legal, tax and regulatory issues. A member of the Automotive Press Association and one of a relatively small number of women on the car beat, Chapman has discussed the automotive industry multiple times of National Public Radio, and in 2014 was selected as an honorary judge at the prestigious Cobble Beach Concours d’Elegance. She has written for numerous national outlets including Time, People, Al-Jazeera America, Fortune, Daily Beast, MSN.com, Newsweek, The Detroit News and Detroit Free Press. The winner of the Society of Professional Journalists award for outstanding reporting, Chapman has had dozens of articles in The New York Times, including two on the coveted front page. She has completed a manuscript about centenarian car enthusiast Margaret Dunning, titled “Belle of the Concours.”
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Patrícia holds her PhD in Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases from the Leiden University Medical Center in Leiden, The Netherlands. She has studied Applied Biology at Universidade do Minho and was a postdoctoral research fellow at Instituto de Medicina Molecular in Lisbon, Portugal. Her work has been focused on molecular genetic traits of infectious agents such as viruses and parasites.
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Mary M. Chapman began her professional career at United Press International, running both print and broadcast desks. She then became a Michigan correspondent for what is now Bloomberg BNA, where she mainly covered the automotive industry plus legal, tax and regulatory issues. A member of the Automotive Press Association and one of a relatively small number of women on the car beat, Chapman has discussed the automotive industry multiple times of National Public Radio, and in 2014 was selected as an honorary judge at the prestigious Cobble Beach Concours d’Elegance. She has written for numerous national outlets including Time, People, Al-Jazeera America, Fortune, Daily Beast, MSN.com, Newsweek, The Detroit News and Detroit Free Press. The winner of the Society of Professional Journalists award for outstanding reporting, Chapman has had dozens of articles in The New York Times, including two on the coveted front page. She has completed a manuscript about centenarian car enthusiast Margaret Dunning, titled “Belle of the Concours.”
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