Low CC16 Protein Levels Linked to COPD Progression, Worse Lung Function in Study

Low CC16 Protein Levels Linked to COPD Progression, Worse Lung Function in Study
Low levels of the protein CC16 in blood are associated with worse lung function and more severe disease among people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a new study suggests. The study, “Reduced Serum Concentration of CC16 Is Associated with Severity of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Contributes to the Diagnosis and Assessment of the Disease,” was published in the International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. The Clara cell secretory protein, known as CC16, plays an important role in protecting cells in the lungs from inflammation and stress. As such, it has been thought to play a role in several lung conditions, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, sarcoidosis, and asthma. However, its association with COPD is still unclear. Now, researchers in China sought to explore the possible role of CC16 in COPD. To do so, they measured the protein's levels in the blood of 98 people — 56 men and 42 women, average age 63.8 years — with stable COPD. Those levels were then compared with those of 48 people without COPD, specifically 19 men and 29 women, with an average age of 62.5 years. The average level
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