MUSC Resumes Clinical Trial Testing Targeted Lung Denervation

MUSC Resumes Clinical Trial Testing Targeted Lung Denervation
Following a stop due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) has become the first medical center to restart the AIRFLOW-3 clinical trial, which is testing a procedure called targeted lung denervation as a potential therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). "We’re thoughtfully re-engaging in a safe program," Charlie Strange, MD, professor of pulmonary and critical care medicine at MUSC, said in an university news story. Targeted lung denervation involves putting a specialized catheter in the lungs, and then using radio waves to destroy nerves thought to regulate airway constriction and mucus production. By disrupting nerve transmission, targeted lung denervation is intended to cause airways to relax and decrease mucus production. That, in turn, is expected to reduce COPD exacerbations. Conceptually, this is similar to how bronchodilators medications for COPD that literally mean "airway wideners" work. Importantly, targeted nerve denervation is not meant to be a replacement for t
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